Makeda Bilqis Literary Awards

Promoting Excellence in Poetry & Fiction

                                                  Director Yvonne J. Yon

 

   The 2016 Makeda Bilqis Literary Award for Poetry Contest is underway and will be judged by the Director, Y. J. Yon and Editors. The first place winner will receive $100.00. The contest is open to poets living in the United States, writing at any stage in their career. We look forward to hearing from you, and thank you for your submission. We promise that this will be our best season ever. God Bless you all.

      

      Guidelines for Submission

Makeda Bilqis Literary Awards will only accept submissions by mail for the contest dated September 16, 2016 – October 14, 2015. No entries will be accepted after the post mark date: October 14, 2016. A 12.00 entry Fee paid by U. S. postal money order is required to be considered for all contest.  

No Checks. [Postal Money Orders Only]

All paper submissions to Makeda Bilqis Literary Awards must be accompanied by a postage-paid and self-addressed return envelope.

Submissions should be addressed to: The Editors

                                               Makeda Bilqis Literary Awards

                                                      Post Office Box 622142

                                                Orlando, Florida 32862-8402

 

  • POETRY: Poets may submit a single poem, no more than 3 pages in length with a $12 entry fee, postmarked by October 14, 2016. Please submit two copies of your poem with one bio page. The bio should be attached to one copy of the poem. The bio page should include name, address, email address and a telephone number. Poems submitted must be original, unpublished work of the submitting author and must be titled on both copies. No simultaneous submissions allowed. If the poem is long, it may be continued on the next page(s). The poem must be written in stanza format and singled spaced no matter how short it maybe.

  • Use an easy-to-read font such as Times or Times Roman, and size 12 point font. A poet may enter more than one poem, but a separate $12.00 entry fee must accompany the other submission (s). Do not send hand written work. Translations are not eligible. All work must be written in English. Snail mail only post marked by October 14, 2016 is eligible to be considered for a prize. All poems are read blind. Strip your manuscript of all identifying material, excluding title page otherwise the manuscript will not be considered.

  • FICTION: Fiction writers may submit no more than 1500 words with a $12.00 entry fee, postmarked by :To Be Announced. Please submit two copies of your piece with one bio page. The bio should be attached to one copy of your short story. The bio page should include name, address, email address and a telephone number. Short stories submitted must be original, unpublished work of the submitting author and must be titled on both copies. No simultaneous submissions allowed. Use an easy-to-read font such as Times or Times Roman, and size 12 point font. A writer may enter more than one short story, but a separate $12.00 entry fee must accompany the other submission (s) Do not send hand written work. Translations are not eligible. All work must be written in English. Snail mail only post marked by: To Be Announced is eligible to be considered for a prize. All short stories are read blind. Strip your manuscript of all identifying material, excluding title page otherwise, the manuscript will not be considered.


  • OTHER CONSIDERATIONS: Contest winners will be announced in the Fall, November 4, 2016 on the website and by mail, and other social media cites such as Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Checks will be mailed on the same date.

 

Six Things To Remember

1. Join a good writers group.
2. Writing is a full-time job.

3. Write to entertain, but not only yourself.

4. Write to inspire your audience.
5. You are a part of your audience.

6. You should enjoy reading your own work as well as others.


Queen of Sheba Story continued

The meal lasted for several hours and featured hot, spicy foods that were certain to make all who ate thirsty and sleepy (as King Solomon had planned.) Since the meal ended very late, the king invited Queen Makeda to stay overnight in the palace in his quarters. She agreed as long as they would sleep in separate beds and the king would not seek to take advantage of her. He vowed to honor her chastity, but also requested that she not take anything in the palace. Outraged by such a suggestion, the Queen protested that she was not a thief and then promised as requested.

Not long after the encounter, the Queen, dying of thirst, searched the palace for water. Once she found a large water jar and proceeded to drink, the King startled her by stating:

"You have broken your oath that you would not

take anything by force that is in my palace.

The Queen protested, of course, that surely

the promise did not cover something so

insignificant and plentiful as water, but

Solomon argued that there was nothing in the

world more valuable than water, for without

it nothing could live. Makeda reluctantly

admitted the truth of this and apologized for

her mistake, begging for water for her parched

throat. Solomon, now released from his promise,

assuaged her thirst and his own, immediately

taking the Queen as his lover."(6)

The following day as the Queen and her entourage prepared to leave Israel, the King placed a ring on her hand and stated, "If you have a son, give this to him and send him to me." After returning to the land of Sheba, Queen Makeda did indeed have a son, whom she named Son-of-the-wise-man, and reared as a prince and her heir apparent to the throne.

Upon reaching adulthood, the young man wished to visit his father, so the Queen prepared another entourage, this time headed by Tamrin. She sent a message to Solomon to anoint their son as king of Ethiopia and to mandate that thenceforth only the males descended from their son should rule Sheba.

Solomon and the Jewish people rejoiced when his son arrived in Israel. The king anointed him as the Queen had requested and renamed him Menelik, meaning "how handsome he is."



Purpose of the contest

The purpose of our annual writing contest, named in honor of Makeda Bilqis, is to help writers reach professional goals in writing through a broad array of categories. We also strive to encourage student writers. In addition to cash prizes, winners will be listed on the Makeda Bilqis Literary website, and are automatically considered for publication in the forth coming Makeda Bilqis Literary Review.


Continued from Home Page

The Story of the Queen of Sheba


"My Lord, how happy I am. Would that I could
remain here always, if but as the humblest of

your workers, so that I could always hear your

words and obey you.

"How happy I am when I interrogate you! How

happy when you answer me. My whole being is

moved with pleasure; my soul is filled; my

feet no longer stumble; I thrill with delight.

"Your wisdom and goodness," she continued, "are

beyond all measure. They are excellence itself.

Under your influence I am placing new values on

life. I see light in the darkness; the firefly

in the garden reveals itself in newer beauty. I

discover added luster in the pearl; a greater

radiance in the morning star, and a softer

harmony in the moonlight. Blessed be the God that

brought me here; blessed be He who permitted your

majestic mind to be revealed to me; blessed be the

One who brought me into your house to hear your voice."(5)

Solomon had a harem of over 700 wives and concubines, yet, he was enamored by the young Black virgin from Ethiopia. Although he held elaborate banquets in her honor and wined, dined and otherwise entertained her during the length of her visit, they both knew that, according to Ethiopian tradition, the Queen must remain chaste. Nevertheless, the Jewish monarch wished to plant his seed in Makeda, so that he might have a son from her regal African lineage.

To this end the shrewd king conspired to conquer the affection of this young queen with whom he had fallen in love. When, after six months in Israel, Queen Makeda announced to King Solomon that she was ready to return to Ethiopia, he invited her to a magnificent farewell dinner at his palace.